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Biography

Rafael Nadal

Name Rafael Nadal Parera
Country (sports) Spain
Residence Manacor, Balearic Islands, Spain
Date of birth 3 June 1986
Birth place Manacor, Balearic Islands, Spain
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Turned pro 2001
Plays Left-handed (two-handed backhand), born right-handed
Coach(es) Toni Nadal (1990–2017)
Carlos Moyá (2017–)
Prize money US$ 80,124,432
 3rd all-time leader in earnings
Singles
Career record 822–178 (82.2% in Grand Slamand ATP World Tour main draw matches, and in Davis Cup)
Career titles 69 (ranked 6th in the Open Era)
Highest ranking No. 1 (18 August 2008)
Current ranking No. 7 (20 March 2017)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open W (2009)
French Open W (2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014)
Wimbledon W (2008, 2010)
US Open W (2010, 2013)
Other tournaments
Tour Finals F (2010, 2013)
Olympic Games W (2008)
Doubles
Career record 130–71
Career titles 11
Highest ranking No. 26 (8 August 2005)
Current ranking No. 115 (10 October 2016)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open 3R (2004, 2005)
Wimbledon 2R (2005)
US Open SF (2004)
Other doubles tournaments
Olympic Games W (2016)
Team competitions
Davis Cup W (2004, 2008, 2009, 2011)
Medal record
Representing  Spain
Men’s Tennis
2008 Beijing Singles
2016 Rio de Janeiro Doubles

About-

Rafael Nadal was born in Manacor, Balearic Islands, Spain. His father, Sebastián Nadal, is a businessman who owns an insurance company and a glass and window company, Vidres Mallorca, and manages his own restaurant, Sa Punta. His mother is Ana María Parera, a housewife. He has a younger sister named María Isabel. His uncle, Miguel Ángel Nadal, is a retired professional footballer, who played for RCD Mallorca, FC Barcelona, and the Spanish national team. Nadal supports football clubs Real Madrid and RCD Mallorca. Recognizing that Nadal had a natural talent for tennis, another uncle, Toni Nadal, a former professional tennis player, introduced him to tennis when he was three years old.

At age eight, Nadal won an under-12 regional tennis championship at a time when he was also a promising football player. This made Toni Nadal intensify training, and at that time he encouraged Nadal to play left-handed for a natural advantage on the tennis court, as he noticed Nadal played forehand shots with two hands. This may be due to the fact he is ambidextrous, playing tennis with his left hand, and writing with his right.

When Nadal was 12, he won the Spanish and European tennis titles in his age group and was playing tennis and football all the time. Nadal’s father made him choose between football and tennis so that his school work would not deteriorate entirely. Nadal said: “I chose tennis. Football had to stop straight away.”When he was 14, the Spanish tennis federation requested that he leave Mallorca and move to Barcelona to continue his tennis training. Nadal’s family turned down this request, partly because they feared it would hurt his education,[39] but also because Toni said that “I don’t want to believe that you have to go to America, or other places to be a good athlete. You can do it from your home.” The decision to stay home meant that Nadal received less financial support from the federation; instead, Nadal’s father covered the costs. In May 2001, he defeated former Grand Slam tournament champion Pat Cash in a clay-court exhibition match.

Nadal turned professional at the age of 15, and participated in two events on the ITF junior circuit. In 2002, at the age of 16, Nadal reached the semifinals of the Boy’s Singles tournament at Wimbledon, in his first ITF junior event. In the same year he helped Spain defeat the USA in the final of the Junior Davis Cup in his second, and final, appearance on the ITF junior circuit.

By the age of 17, he beat Roger Federer the first time they played and became the youngest man to reach the third round at Wimbledon since Boris Becker. At 19, Nadal won the French Open the first time he played it, a feat not accomplished in Paris for more than 20 years. He eventually won it the first four times he played at Roland Garros. In 2003, he had won the ATP Newcomer of the Year Award. Early in his career, Nadal became known for his habit of biting the trophies he won.

 

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